Symantec’s 2017 Internet Security Threat Report (ISTR) lists the Services Industry at the top of its 2016 list of most hacked industries followed by Finance, Insurance, & Real Estate. These two industries were at the top of the list for 2015 showing that their popularity with cyber-criminals has not waned.

Drilling down to a more granular level we see that specifically, Business Services and Health Services top the charts. Given the strict reporting requirements in the healthcare segment it is really no surprise to see this niche at the top of the list. Business Services, a still rather broad sub-niche, tops the list accounting for nearly a quarter of all incidents.

Some Historical Perspective

According to Symantec’s data, by the end of 2016 over 7 billion identities have been stolen over the last 8 years! That is nearly 1 identity for every single living person on the planet.

Looking at just the past 3 years, the trend in breach and data loss looks like this:

At first glance 2015’s Identities Stolen figure might seem like a misprint with approximately half the identities stolen as compared to 2014 and 2016. But as the chart below shows, major breaches just on either side of 2015 led to the spikes in its neighboring years.

2014 of course reflects both the Home Depot and Target breaches while 2016 includes the mega breach of Friend Finder Networks.

You have a friend in Konsultek

No matter what your industry or your business size, Konsultek can help you secure your business network and data. Our custom solutions are both robust and cost effective and our suite of managed services give even the smallest organizations access to world class security solutions with little to no capital expense. Gives us a call and learn more about our free vulnerability assessments.

Symantec’s 2017 Internet Security Threat Report (ISTR) lists the Services Industry at the top of its 2016 list of most hacked industries followed by Finance, Insurance, & Real Estate. These two industries were at the top of the list for 2015 showing that their popularity with cybercriminals has not waned.

 

Drilling down to a more granular level we see that specifically, Business Services and Health Services top the charts. Given the strict reporting requirements in the healthcare segment it is really no surprise to see this niche at the top of the list. Business Services, a still rather broad sub-niche, tops the list accounting for nearly a quarter of all incidents.

Some Historical Perspective

According to Symantec’s data, by the end of 2016 over 7 billion identities have been stolen over the last 8 years! That is nearly 1 identity for every single living person on the planet.

Looking at just the past 3 years, the trend in breach and data loss looks like this:

At first glance 2015’s Identities Stolen figure might seem like a misprint with approximately half the identities stolen as compared to 2014 and 2016. But as the chart below shows, major breaches just on either side of 2015 led to the spikes in its neighboring years.

2014 of course reflects both the Home Depot and Target breaches while 2016 includes the mega breach of Friend Finder Networks.

You have a friend in Konsultek

No matter what your industry or your business size, Konsultek can help you secure your business network and data. Our custom solutions are both robust and cost effective and our suite of managed services give even the smallest organizations access to world class security solutions with little to no capital expense. Gives us a call and learn more about our free vulnerability assessments.

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Rather than write the 1000th post about WannaCry (although our Partners at Proofpoint, their Engineer Darien Huss and a fellow called MalwareTech deserve a serious shout-out from the world for stopping WannaCry) I decided to cover something with potentially huge financial implications that has virtually gone under the radar by comparison.

While WannaCry was grabbing the cybersecurity headlines for the week, it turns out that online signature giant DocuSign was more quietly and in a rather methodical fashion, publicly disclosing the details of a significant and serious cyberbreach themselves.

Here’s an abbreviated timeline of what we know so far from DocuSign themselves.

Update 5/9/2017 – Malicious Email Campaign

DocuSign is tracking a malicious email campaign where the subject reads: “Completed: docusign.com – Wire Transfer Instructions for recipient-name Document Ready for Signature”.

The email contains a link to a downloadable Word Document which is designed to trick the recipient into running what’s known as macro-enabled-malware.

Update 5/15/2017 – Malicious Email Campaign

DocuSign is tracking a malicious email campaign where the subject reads: Completed *company name* – Accounting Invoice *number* Document Ready for Signature;The email contains a link to a downloadable Word Document which is designed to trick the recipient into running what’s known as macro-enabled-malware.

These emails are not associated with DocuSign. They originate from a malicious third-party using DocuSign branding in the headers and body of the email. The emails are sent from non-DocuSign-related domains including dse@docus.com. Legitimate DocuSign signing emails come from @docusign.com or @docusign.net email addresses.

Update 5/15/2017 – Latest update on malicious email campaign

Last week and again this morning, DocuSign detected an increase in phishing emails sent to some of our customers and users – and we posted alerts here on the DocuSign Trust Site and in social media. The emails “spoofed” the DocuSign brand in an attempt to trick recipients into opening an attached Word document that, when clicked, installs malicious software. As part of our process in response to phishing incidents, we confirmed that DocuSign’s core eSignature service, envelopes and customer documents remain secure.

However, as part of our ongoing investigation, today we confirmed that a malicious third party had gained temporary access to a separate, non-core communication system used for service-related announcements that contained a list of email addresses. A complete forensic analysis has confirmed that only email addresses were accessed; no names, physical addresses, passwords, social security numbers, credit card data or other information was accessed. No content or any customer documents sent through DocuSign’s eSignature system was accessed; and DocuSign’s core eSignature service, envelopes and customer documents and data remain secure.

Update 5/16/2017 @ 8:55 Pacific Time – Key Update on Malicious Campaign

Q: Have the email addresses of my employees, customers or customers’ customers been exposed as part of this incident?
A: As part of our ongoing investigation, we can now confirm that no signers were on the list of email addresses that was accessed maliciously unless they had signed up for a DocuSign account. That could include direct DocuSign customers; someone who signed a document and elected to open a DocuSign account; or someone who signed up for a DocuSign freemium account – via docusign.com, through a partner integration, or via the DocuSign mobile client.

Update 5/17/2017 @ 1:02 PM Pacific Time – New Phishing Campaign Discovered Today

DocuSign has observed a new phishing campaign that began the morning of May 16 (Pacific Time). The email comes from “dse@dousign.com” with the subject “Legal acknowledgement for <person> Document is Ready for Signature” and it contains a link to a malicious, macro-enabled Word document. We suggest you do not open this email, but rather delete it immediately.

The Ultimate Phishing Scam?

This may very well be the ultimate spear phishing campaign. While the number of email addresses compromised has not been disclosed, we can assume it is A LOT and a considerable portion of those affected routinely use DocuSign multiple times a month, if not weekly or daily. Since DocuSign emails are both expected and “trusted” we can only further assume that these phishing campaigns are being effective. No official report on just how effective, so far, but perhaps we’ll get an update further details emerge.

It seems likely that this scam will continue for a very long time given that DocuSign reportedly has 100 million users.

The Lesson You Can Learn

“However, as part of our ongoing investigation, today we confirmed that a malicious third party had gained temporary access to a separate, non-core communication system used for service-related announcements that contained a list of email addresses.” (Emphasis added)

The lesson to be learned here is that in today’s world no part of your network can be considered “non-core” when it comes to security. If the data is worth saving within your network, it is worth protecting!

Konsultek and Its Partners

Konsultek and its partners like Proofpoint, CheckPoint, ForeScout, CarbonBlack and many others work together to build custom security solutions for businesses of all sizes in all markets. When you’re ready to learn about your network vulnerabilities and how to correct them please give us a call.

 

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There has been a major shift in the type of breach incident happening in the education services sector according to the Verizon 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report.

Can you spot the shift in the graphic below?

Source: Verizon 2017 DBIR

Cyber-Espionage has exploded since mid-2012! That’s right, because of the cutting-edge research that happens at many colleges and universities they have become a target for state-sponsored hacking.

As Verizon puts it…

“So college isn’t just pizza and tailgates—research studies across myriad disciplines conducted at universities put them in the sights of state-affiliated groups.”

So while of course the personal information of students and faculty were commonly extracted during breaches (a little more than half of all breaches) intellectual property losses were tied to a little more than a quarter of all breaches.

Targeted or Random Acts of Unkindness?

The evidence is clear that state-sponsored hacking and some criminal, profit based hacking is specifically targeting the hallowed halls of our academic institutions.

How do They do it?

Good question. Here is the answer in a graphic from the Verizon report.

Phishing email was the predominant threat vector in the social category while the use of stolen credentials was the dominant hacking technique. One interesting thing to note is the number of incidents involving Social and one or more other vector.

How Would You Like to Get a Threat Vulnerabilty Education for FREE?

At Konsultek we believe an educated client is the best client. That’s why we offer a variety of free vulnerability assessments to help you determine both your risk exposure and the likelihood of that exposure in regards to the veracity of your current security measures. Who would you rather educate you, the good guys at Konsultek or the bad guys out in the wild? Well, what are you waiting for? Pick up the phone and give us a call today so we can get your vulnerability assessment scheduled ASAP!

 

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The 2017 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) has been released and as always, it is chock full of fascinating facts about the current state of the hacking and cyber threat world. You can get the full report from Verizon for free here.

Who are the Perps?

According to this year’s DBIR the breakdown of who’s been doing the most hacking looks like this:

  • 75% Perpetrated by outsiders
  • 51% Linked to organized criminal groups
  • 25% Involved internal actors
  • 18% Starred state affiliated actors
  • 3% Featured multiple parties
  • 2% Involved partners

How Did They Do it?

  • 62% Of breaches featured hacking
  • 51% Involved Malware
  • 81% Leveraged stolen or weak passwords
  • 43% Were social attacks
  • 14% Were linked to errors or privilege misuse
  • 8% Involve physical actions

The above information is just a sneak peek at a portion of the summary data contained in the 2017 DBIR. Next week we’ll take a deeper dive into what industries were hardest hit and by whom as well as get into specifics of how these industries were attacked.

 

 

 

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So what does motivate the latest generation of hackers? “Idealism and impressing their mates.” This according to a study by the British National Crime Agency.

The purpose of the study was to ascertain why teens, who ordinarily be involved in traditional crime, would be drawn into the world of cybercrime.

What the agency found through debriefs of the study participants is that financial reward is not a prime motivator for this younger generation of hackers. The recognition gained and the challenge of accomplishing the hack are far larger motivators.

“During his debrief, Subject 7, who was jailed for Computer Misuse Act and fraud offences, told officers, “…it made me popular, I enjoyed the feeling… I looked up to those users with the best reputations”.”

Easy Access to Tools a Contributing Factor

As noted many times on this blog, malware, DDOS-for-hire services and other hacking tools are easy to come by if you are looking for them and this easy access to tools was found to be a contributing factor to young people slipping over to the dark side.

No Socio-economic Bias

Unlike other crimes such as selling drugs, the study found no socio-economic bias. Essentially kids from all walks of life and privilege are equally likely to end up being attracted to cyber-crime and at a much younger age.  The data collected during the study indicates that the average age of a cybercriminal was just 17 as compared to 37 in drug cases and 39 in economic crime cases.

Konsultek has You Covered

Whatever their motivation, hacking an cybercriminals pose a significant threat to organizations of all sizes and all types. That’s why you need to be certain that your network is not vulnerable to penetration, not matter what type of technique is used. That’s why our Vulnerability Assessment service has become so popular.  During a Vulnerability Assessment our team of skilled engineers identifies all the potential vulnerabilities BEFORE they are found by hackers and cybercriminals.

Interested? Give us a call and see when we can get your assessment scheduled.

 

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